Tag Archives: therapy

Materials breakthrough

New approach to improving materials for interfacing neural tissue with electronic biomedical devices reported

Modern electronic biomedical devices are enabling a wide range of sophisticated health interventions, from seizure detection and Parkinson’s disease therapy to functional artificial limbs, cochlear implants and smart contact lenses. (more…)

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Newly found tactics in offense-defense struggle with hepatitis C virus

The hepatitis C virus has a previously unrecognized tactic to outwit antiviral responses and sustain a long-term infection. It also turns out that some people are genetically equipped with a strong countermeasure to the virus’ attempt to weaken the attack on it.

The details of these findings suggest potential targets for treating HCV, according to a research team led by Dr. Ram Savan, assistant professor of immunology at the University of Washington. The study was published in Nature Immunology. (more…)

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Nature Medicine

Engineering professor co-authors Nature Medicine paper on HIV

Ryan Zurakowski, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Delaware, is co-author of a paper appearing in Nature Medicine on Jan. 12 highlighting the role of T-cells in HIV.

The paper, titled “HIV-1 Persistence in CD4+ T-Cells with Stem Cell-Like Properties,” provides evidence that a particular T-cell type may help researchers better understand why HIV can persist despite treatment. (more…)

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What a difference a 3-D makes

3-D CT scans give the U a leg up in spotting veterinary injuries

When Gauge fell from a rooftop a few months ago, he had two strikes against him:

• The ground was five stories down

• He was a dog, not a cat

Rushed to the University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center, Gauge looked like a goner. Even after his internal injuries were tended to, his fractured pelvis loomed like a third strike that would hobble him for life. That’s what it’s like for too many animals, whose veterinary surgeons have only conventional X-rays or a stack of two-dimensional CT scans to guide them as they go into surgery.  (more…)

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Caching In: How Some Organizations Are Using Big Data to Change the Way They Do Business

As big data access shifts to the masses, The Weather Company and other top global companies are showing the world how it’s done.

REDMOND, Wash. Feb. 12, 2012 —Big data is changing the way organizations do business, make discoveries, and interact with each other. In fact, pundits are predicting that 2013 will be the year organizations across a range of industries begin implementing big data strategies, or face obsolescence. As David Selinger wrote in a recent article on Forbes online: “If executives don’t find a way to trap, tame, and train their data monsters, they’ll be extinct in two years—fossils who’ve missed the new world order.”

Microsoft believes that big data has the power to drive practical and theoretical insights that have eluded people to date. In the past, high costs and technology limitations have constrained access to data storage infrastructure and the tools needed to manage and analyze large quantities of data. This is finally starting to change. (more…)

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Common Food Preservative May Slow, Even Stop Tumor Growth

ANN ARBOR — Nisin, a common food preservative, may slow or stop squamous cell head and neck cancers, a University of Michigan study found.

What makes this particularly good news is that the Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Organization approved nisin as safe for human consumption decades ago, says Yvonne Kapila, the study’s principal investigator and professor at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. (more…)

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New Insights into How Genetic Differences among Individuals Influence Breast Cancer Risk from Low-Dose Radiation

Berkeley Lab research could lead to new ways to ID women who have higher risk of breast cancer from low-dose radiation

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have identified tissue mechanisms that may influence a woman’s susceptibility or resistance to breast cancer after exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation, such as the levels used in full-body CT scans and radiotherapy.

The research could lead to new ways to identify women who have higher or lower risks of breast cancer from low-dose radiation. Such a predictive tool could help guide the treatment of cancer patients who may be better served by non-radiation therapies. (more…)

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Going Viral to Kill Zits: UCLA/Pitt Scientists Uncover Virus with Potential to Stop Pimples

Watch out, acne. Doctors soon may have a new weapon against zits: a harmless virus living on our skin that naturally seeks out and kills the bacteria that cause pimples.

The new findings by scientists at UCLA and the University of Pittsburgh are published in the Sept. 25 online edition of the American Society for Microbiology’s journal mBio. (more…)

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