Tag Archives: immune response

Study reveals workings of immune response to deadly fungal infections

Now that scientists understand what triggers key steps in the immune response to menacing fungi such as Candida albicans, they hope to develop ways to make it work better.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Every year, fungal infections threaten thousands of patients — from those with depressed immune systems to others who have had surgeries or devices such as catheters implanted. Moreover, some anti-fungal medications are beginning to lose their power. (more…)

Read More

Brain Parasite Not Your Typical Invader

UA researcher Anita Koshy has received two grants to study how Toxoplasma infection affects the brain’s immune response, and also how it manipulates the neurons with which the parasite interacts.

For most people, the idea that their brain may be infected with a microscopic parasite isn’t exactly cause for celebration. (more…)

Read More

Making Old Lungs Look New Again

Animal research suggests ibuprofen can reduce lung inflammation in elderly

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New research shows that the lungs become more inflammatory with age and that ibuprofen can lower that inflammation.

In fact, immune cells from old mouse lungs fought tuberculosis bacteria as effectively as cells from young mice after lung inflammation was reduced by ibuprofen. The ibuprofen had no effect on the immune response to TB in young mice. (more…)

Read More

Gene therapy leads to robust improvements in animal model of fatal muscle disease

Preclinical studies show that gene therapy can improve muscle strength in small- and large-animal models of a fatal congenital childhood disease know as X-linked myotubular myopathy.

The findings, appearing  as the cover story in the January 22, 2014 issue of Science Translational Medicine, also demonstrate the feasibility of future clinical trials of gene therapy for this devastating disease. (more…)

Read More

Nature Medicine

Engineering professor co-authors Nature Medicine paper on HIV

Ryan Zurakowski, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Delaware, is co-author of a paper appearing in Nature Medicine on Jan. 12 highlighting the role of T-cells in HIV.

The paper, titled “HIV-1 Persistence in CD4+ T-Cells with Stem Cell-Like Properties,” provides evidence that a particular T-cell type may help researchers better understand why HIV can persist despite treatment. (more…)

Read More

Effects of Climate Change on West Nile Virus

A study projects how climate change may affect virus-carrying mosquitoes across the southern U.S. Changes are expected to vary with region, and the southern states should see a trend toward longer seasons of mosquito activity and smaller midsummer mosquito populations

The varied influence of climate change on temperature and precipitation may have an equally wide-ranging effect on the spread of West Nile virus, suggesting that public health efforts to control the virus will need to take a local rather than global perspective, according to a study published this week in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (more…)

Read More

Tactics of new Middle East virus suggest treating by altering lung cells’ response to infection

A new virus that causes severe breathing distress and kidney failure elicits a distinctive airway cell response to allow it to multiply.  Scientists studying the Human Coronavirus-Erasmus Medical Center, which first appeared April 2012 in the Middle East, have discovered helpful details about its stronghold tactics.

Their findings predict that certain currently available compounds might treat the infection.  These could act not by killing the virus directly but by keeping lung cells from being forced to create a hospitable environment for the virus to reproduce.  The researchers caution that their lab and computer predictions would need to be tested to see if the drugs work clinically. (more…)

Read More

Zinc Helps against Infection by Tapping Brakes in Immune Response

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New research suggests that zinc helps control infections by gently tapping the brakes on the immune response in a way that prevents out-of-control inflammation that can be damaging and even deadly.

Scientists determined in human cell culture and animal studies that a protein lures zinc into key cells that are first-responders against infection. The zinc then interacts with a process that is vital to the fight against infection and by doing so helps balance the immune response. (more…)

Read More