Tag Archives: new york times

Remarkable Résumé: UA Student Journalist’s Career Includes CNN, New York Times

UA journalism student Amer Taleb has already had a stellar undergraduate career, working in newsrooms across the nation.

Amer Taleb‘s journalistic talent took him to Japan this summer, where he and other winners of the Roy W. Howard National Collegiate Reporting Competition toured multiple cities on a nine-day study trip. While in Hiroshima, he bought a silver keychain in the shape of a coin that was inscribed with a charge to work toward a more peaceful world. (more…)

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Panelists explore the NSA and the ‘knotty’ question of the public’s right to know

Without any sort of legal protections in place, journalists reporting on the National Security Agency’s (NSA) massive surveillance program are facing a huge challenge, said Spencer Ackerman, the Guardian’s U.S. national security editor, during a panel discussion at the Law School on Dec. 5.

Ackerman took part in a discussion titled “Investigative Reporting, Espionage and NSA Leaks” with James Bamford, who is widely regarded as the chief chronicler of the NSA, and Gabriel Schoenfeld, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. The discussion, sponsored by KLAMP and the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism, was moderated by David A. Schulz, the Floyd Abrams Clinical Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and partner at Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP in New York. (more…)

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London calling

UD professor spends semester as London artist-in-residence

It was poring through archives of the Zoological Society of London that gave Virginia Bradley the idea.

She asked officials of the society, dedicated to animal conservation and research, if she could be their artist-in-residence. They accepted, and this year the UD professor of art became their first.

“At first they didn’t know what to do with me,” Bradley said, but she has thrived.  (more…)

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Journalist describes how food companies ‘hook’ consumers

In 2009, while investigating a sudden influx of illnesses caused by food contamination, journalist Michael Moss learned that there was another, and arguably more severe, public health crisis at hand: the disproportionate use of salt, sugar, and fat in a variety of everyday foods.

Moreover, Moss said in his recent Poynter Lecture at Yale, he came to the frightening conclusion that this was not accidental on the food companies’ part, but intentional — that the these unhealthy ingredients were added to attract consumers and make them dependent on products. (more…)

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Technology in the Classroom

UD students use iPads to study the presidential election

Ralph Begleiter and Paul Brewer, professors in the University of Delaware’s Department of Communication, wanted to see if students enrolled in their Road to the Presidency class would pay more attention to the presidential election if media were at their fingertips 24/7. Through a UD Information Technologies (IT) Transformation Grant, iPads were distributed to students enrolled in the course.

“There is something about a student laying their finger on the iPad and discovering what event occurred to make a jump in public opinion popularity occur. It’s that interactivity that makes it a personal experience for the student,” Begleiter observed. (more…)

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Crowdsourcing Site Compiles New Sign Language for Math and Science

A multimedia feature published this week in the New York Times, “Pushing Science’s Limits in Sign Language Lexicon,” outlines efforts in the United States and Europe to develop sign language versions of specialized terms used in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The article shares newly defined signs for terms like “light-year,” “organism” and “photosynthesis.” It also describes a successful crowdsourcing effort started at the University of Washington in 2008 that lets members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community build their own guide to the evolving lexicon of science.

“It’s not a dictionary,” explained Richard Ladner, a UW professor of computer science and engineering. “The goal of the forum is to be constantly changing, a reflection of the current use.” (more…)

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‘Fiscal cliff’ challenge explored in ‘Congress and the Politics of Problem Solving’

John Wilkerson, University of Washington professor of political science, is the co-author with E. Scott Adler of the University of Colorado of a new book titled “Congress and the Politics of Problem Solving,” published in December by Cambridge University Press. Wilkerson answered a few questions about the book for UW Today.

Q: What is the central concept behind your new book?

A: We argue that members of Congress care about solving problems in society and that their electoral success partly depends upon their collective performance as a problem solving institution.

Q: You and your co-author state in press notes that your book “offers a glass half-full rather than a glass half-empty perspective on lawmaking.” Can you explain?

Understandably, the media, scholars and the public tend to be more attentive to political conflict (especially partisan conflict) than to political cooperation. Yet on most issues, including the most important issues, consensus and cooperation are the norm within Congress. (more…)

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Meet the ‘Halo 4’ Engineers Delivering ‘30 Seconds of Fun’ – Early and Often

“Halo 4” launches tomorrow, and millions of fans will start blasting their way through the biggest and most detailed “Halo” universe yet.

REDMOND, Wash. — Nov. 5, 2012 — It happens early and often in every “Halo” game: the ‘30 seconds of fun.’

That phrase refers to the heart-thumping period when players risk pixelated life and limb to take on teeming hordes of enemies. The ‘30 seconds of fun’ mantra began with Bungie, the game studio that created the first five games of the “Halo” franchise.

But “Halo” has always delivered a rich story alongside the action; the game’s universe has spawned comic books and New York Times bestselling novels. “Halo” takes the Goldilocks approach to gaming: it doesn’t exhaust you with long storytelling animations nor numb you with nonstop battles. It finds a middle ground: It’s just right. (more…)

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