Tag Archives: future

Ancient Cold Period Could Provide Clues About Future Climate Change

AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that a well-known period of abrupt climate change 12,000 years ago occurred rapidly in northern latitudes but much more gradually in equatorial regions, a discovery that could prove important for understanding and responding to future climate change. (more…)

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THE FUTURE OF CLOUD SERVICES

There is still quite a bit of interest in cloud services, and still no small demand for them. Due to this, there’s been a rush by all manner of service providers, both old and new, to provide cloud offerings to hungry customers. Indeed, of the roughly 20,000 North American service providers, just about 20 percent of these offer cloud services at this time, and this number is expected to grow sharply over the next few years. Yet at the same time, there will be a lot of attrition among these providers, if only because many of these organizations are only regional in nature, and offer only a small array of products — most of them just one or two.

At least that’s what Ashar Baig, a research director at Gigaom predicts. He provided his view on the near future and the recent past of cloud services at the recent ITEXPO in Las Vegas, Nevada. (more…)

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Chemists turn key to new energy future

U chemists explain new reaction, demonstrating how quantum mechanics can help design more energy-efficient catalysts.

You’ve probably worn polyester clothes, and you’ve certainly used plenty of plastic objects and paint. But did you know that they come from natural gas?

The main component of natural gas, methane, has just one carbon atom and is the smallest fossil fuel. But as the ultimate source material for the above products and many others it packs an enormous punch. First, however, it must be converted to methanol, an alcohol—and there lies the challenge. (more…)

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Printing the Metals of the Future

3-D printers can create all kinds of things, from eyeglasses to implantable medical devices, straight from a computer model and without the need for molds. But for making spacecraft, engineers sometimes need custom parts that traditional manufacturing techniques and standard 3-D printers can’t create, because they need to have the properties of multiple metals. Now, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are implementing a printing process that transitions from one metal or alloy to another in a single object. (more…)

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Ancient shark teeth give clues to future of Arctic climate change

A new study of sharks that lived in warm Arctic waters millions of years ago suggests that some shark species could handle the falling Arctic salinity that may come with rising temperatures.

The Arctic today is best known for its tundra and polar bear population, but roughly 38 to 53 million years ago during the Eocene epoch, the Arctic was like a huge temperate forest with brackish water, home to a variety of animal life, including ancestors of tapirs, hippo-like creatures, crocodiles and giant tortoises. Much of what is known about the region during this period comes from well-documented terrestrial deposits. Marine records have been harder to come by. (more…)

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Bright Future for Protein Nanoprobes

Berkeley Lab Researchers Discover New Rules for Single-Particle Imaging with Light-Emitting Nanocrystals

The term a “brighter future” might be a cliché, but in the case of ultra-small probes for lighting up individual proteins, it is now most appropriate. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered surprising new rules for creating ultra-bright light-emitting crystals that are less than 10 nanometers in diameter. These ultra-tiny but ultra-bright nanoprobes should be a big asset for biological imaging, especially deep-tissue optical imaging of neurons in the brain.

Working at the Molecular Foundry, a DOE national nanoscience center hosted at Berkeley Lab, a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by James Schuck and Bruce Cohen, both with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division, used advanced single-particle characterization and theoretical modeling to study what are known as “upconverting nanoparticles” or UCNPs. Upconversion is the process by which a molecule absorbs two or more photons at a lower energy and emits them at higher energies. The research team determined that the rules governing the design of UCNP probes for ensembles of molecules do not apply to UCNP probes designed for single-molecules. (more…)

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CNN’s Zakaria explores the future of the American Dream

“A mood of anxiety seems to pervade American society today,” according to award-winning author and journalist Fareed Zakaria ’86. 

“There is a sense in America that the future is not going to be like the past,“ he said. “So much of the energy, so much of the dynamism in the future is no longer quite as true.”  (more…)

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