Tag Archives: estrogen

Deciphering hormones

Wenner uses AHA funding to investigate hormones, vascular function

Hormones are the chemical envoys for our bodies. They communicate with our brains, heart, bones, muscles and, yes, reproductive organs. University of Delaware physiologist Megan Wenner is working to understand how sex hormones influence vascular function. (more…)

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Are developing heart valves sensitive to environmental chemicals?

Baltimore, MD — Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupters, such as bisphenol A, which mimic estrogen, is associated with adverse health effects. Bisphenol A is commonly found in plastic bottles and plastic food containers. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Daniel Gorelick and Marnie Halpern on the effects of these chemicals on zebrafish shows that embryonic heart valves could be particularly in danger. It is published by Environmental Health Perspectives.

Estrogen hormones are important in all stages of life. They work by binding to receptors inside a cell, which then travel to the nucleus and act on the DNA by turning select genes on and off. But some synthetic chemicals mimic these estrogen hormones by also binding to the receptors. Exposure to them during early development is associated with increased risk of cancers and abnormal formation of the reproductive tract. So detecting such chemicals and identifying their mechanisms of action is of great importance for developmental scientists. (more…)

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Fat cells in breast may connect social stress to breast cancer

Local chemical signals released by fat cells in the mammary gland appear to provide a crucial link between exposure to unrelenting social stressors early in life, and the subsequent development of breast cancer, researchers from the University of Chicago report in the July 2013 issue of the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

Some forms of stress exposure may be associated with an increased risk of certain types of aggressive breast cancer. But the mechanisms linking the biology of social stress to cancer have been hard to identify. To unravel that mechanism, the researchers looked for differences between mice raised in small groups and those that grow up in an isolated setting—an established model of chronic stress without social supports. (more…)

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Skin Care During Pregnancy!

Aggravated hormone level brings about numerous changes to almost every part of woman’s body, from body structure to skin to overall health. A woman can look most entrancing and delightful during her pregnancy. And this is certainly not just an old wife’s tale; it’s a widely accepted truth. While some ladies look luscious during their pregnancies, for others, all the elevated hormonal levels can have entirely opposite effects, leading to many pregnancy skin problems.

On your countdown to motherhood variety of changes take place on your skin and even a slight change from normal on it is evident. There are many skincare products or tropical treatments can get absorbed into your skin and then into your baby’s. So skincare during this nine months countdown requires special attention. (more…)

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Revisiting Sex and Intimacy after Cancer

Two Yale doctors are using herbs, prescriptions, counseling and lifestyle advice to treat problems many women have been embarrassed to talk about—and improving their quality of life.

Noa Benjamini’s natural optimism didn’t flag when she was diagnosed with uterine cancer. “I knew it was treatable,” she recalls. She was recovering from surgery when she got her first hot flash. “That’s when I cried,” she says. Suddenly Benjamini saw herself careening toward old age. “I thought I’d shrivel up,” she says.

Three years later, Benjamini, 48, describes herself as “in a good place,” as a combination of herbs, prescriptions, and diet and exercise have tamed her menopausal symptoms. She attributes that turnaround to the Sexuality Intimacy and Menopause Clinic at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven. (more…)

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Anxious Women’s Brains Work Harder

EAST LANSING, Mich. — In a discovery that could help in the identification and treatment of anxiety disorders, Michigan State University scientists say the brains of anxious women work much harder than those of men.

The finding stems from an experiment in which college students performed a relatively simple task while their brain activity was measured by an electrode cap. Only women who identified themselves as particularly anxious or big worriers recorded high brain activity when they made mistakes during the task.

Jason Moser, lead investigator on the project, said the findings may ultimately help mental health professionals determine which girls may be prone to anxiety problems such as obsessive compulsive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder. (more…)

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Soy and Menopause

*Large-scale study finds soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause*

In the most comprehensive study to date to examine the effects of soy on menopause, researchers have found that two daily servings of soy can reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes by up to 26 percent, compared to a placebo.

The findings, published in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Association, reviewed 19 previous studies that examined more than 1,200 women. (more…)

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Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Reducing Risk of Cancer

EAST LANSING, Mich. — An inexpensive drug that treats Type-2 diabetes has been shown to prevent a number of natural and man-made chemicals from stimulating the growth of breast cancer cells, according to a newly published study by a Michigan State University researcher.

The research, led by pediatrics professor James Trosko and colleagues from South Korea’s Seoul National University, provides biological evidence for previously reported epidemiological surveys that long-term use of the drug metformin for Type-2 diabetes reduces the risk of diabetes-associated cancers, such as breast cancers. (more…)

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