Tag Archives: new york city

Questions for Brandon Marshall: Predicting outcomes of HIV efforts in NYC

New York City continues to battle an HIV epidemic, including among drug users. There are many possible interventions. Researchers have developed a sophisticated predictive computer model to help policymakers figure out which interventions, or combinations of interventions, would have the most meaningful impact.

Brandon Marshall, assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown University, has led the simulation effort ever since he was a postdoctoral scholar at Columbia University. In a new paper in the March edition of the journal Health Affairs a team from Brown and Columbia published the results of the simulation, which projects that New York can significantly reduce new infections among drug users by 2040 by implementing certain combinations of interventions. Marshall spoke with David Orenstein about what the predictive computer model shows. (more…)

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‘Hope through education’

Author Ziolkowski highlights international school construction initiative

What started out as an around-the-world backpacking trek for a recent college graduate turned into a volunteer program that builds hope by constructing schools in some of poorest places on the planet. 

Jim Ziolkowski, best-selling author and founder of buildOn, a nonprofit that erects schools in developing countries, shared his experiences and vision during a talk given Tuesday evening, March 11, at the University of Delaware’s Mitchell Hall.  (more…)

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Sunny days

Alumna pairs passions for writing, science at Weather Channel website

Five years since graduating from the University of Delaware, Laura Dattaro is right where she belongs. Not playing the trumpet professionally, as she assumed she would be entering her freshman year of college, but writing for The Weather Channel at weather.com, immersed in the two things she loves most: writing and science.

Dattaro never thought she would be a journalist. Majoring in English and music and playing for the UD Marching Band, the Honors Program student had ambitions to make music her main career focus. That was until a fellow band member and city news desk editor at The Review, UD’s student run newspaper, gave her a story to work on.  (more…)

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IBM Forms New Watson Group to Meet Growing Demand for Cognitive Innovations

Headquartered in NYC’s “Silicon Alley,” New IBM Watson Group to Include Watson Innovation Hub, Fueling New Products and Start-ups
Watson Group Introduces New Cloud Solutions to Accelerate Research, Visualize Big Data and Enable Analytics Exploration

ARMONK, N.Y. – 09 Jan 2014: IBM today announced it will establish the IBM Watson Group, a new business unit dedicated to the development and commercialization of cloud-delivered cognitive innovations. The move signifies a strategic shift by IBM to accelerate into the marketplace a new class of software, services and apps that think, improve by learning, and discover answers and insights to complex questions from massive amounts of Big Data. (more…)

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Osher presentation

Skype session with author Alexandra Styron illuminates father’s work

A literature class at the University of Delaware’s Osher Lifelong Learning program in Lewes recently participated in an unexpected one-on-one conversation with Alexandra Styron about the life and work of her father, celebrated author William Styron, famous for novels like The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie’s Choice

A novelist in her own right, Alexandra Styron recounts her experiences growing up in a household often full of drama and turmoil in her memoir Reading My Father. (more…)

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Transgender controversies can lead to ‘gender panic,’ study finds

When New York City moved in 2006 to make it easier for transgender people to revise the gender on their birth certificates, the proposal was widely expected to pass.

But the anti-discrimination measure failed, in part because of public opposition to removing the requirement that individuals have genital surgery before claiming a different gender. (more…)

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Grocery delivery service is greener than driving to the store

At the end of a long day, it can be more convenient to order your groceries online while sitting on the living room couch instead of making a late-night run to the store. New research shows it’s also much more environmentally friendly to leave the car parked and opt for groceries delivered to your doorstep.

University of Washington engineers have found that using a grocery delivery service can cut carbon dioxide emissions by at least half when compared with individual household trips to the store. Trucks filled to capacity that deliver to customers clustered in neighborhoods produced the most savings in carbon dioxide emissions. (more…)

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