Tag Archives: parasites

Wild sheep show benefits of putting up with parasites

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual’s infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal’s ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. Reported in the journal PLoS Biology, the finding could provide the groundwork for boosting the resilience of humans and livestock to infection. (more…)

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Galápagos Hawks Hand Down Lice Like Family Heirlooms, Study Finds

A UA-led study provides some of the first evidence for the hypothesis of co-divergence between parasites and hosts acting as a major driver of biodiversity.

Say what you will about the parasitic lifestyle, but in the game of evolution, it’s a winner. (more…)

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UA Study’s Findings Key to Understanding Immunity as We Age

UA researchers have discovered that two separate defects combine to contribute to reduced T cell responses with aging.

Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson have found a key to understanding the aging immune system’s decreased response to infectious diseases, which remain among the leading causes of death in older adults.

Aging profoundly affects the immune system’s T cells – the types of white blood cells that defend against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses, intracellular bacteria or parasites, such as malaria. Newly encountered pathogens are attacked by what are known as naïve T cells, some of which then learn and remember, becoming memory T cells that prevent reinfection when they encounter the same pathogen again. But naïve T cells become depleted with age, leading to less effective immune responses against new infections. (more…)

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Study Suggests Antibiotics Might be Another Suspect in Honey Bee Die-off

The gut bacteria of honey bees have acquired several genes that confer resistance to tetracycline, a direct result of more than five decades of use of antibiotics by American beekeepers and a potential health hazard for bee colonies, a new study by Yale University researchers show.

The genetic analysis of the gut bacteria, which are believed to help in bees’ digestion and ability to ward off parasites, suggests changing antibiotic use by beekeepers might be one factor in the mysterious colony collapse disorder afflicting bee populations. (more…)

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Cracking the Oyster’s Code

International team of scientists finds adaptations to stress in oyster genome

When it comes to stress, oysters know how to deal. The tough-shelled mollusks can survive temperature fluctuations, toxic metals and exposure to air, and a new study of their genetic makeup is helping to explain how.

An international team of scientists, including the University of Delaware’s Patrick M. Gaffney, professor of marine biosciences, sequenced the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in a Nature paper published on Sept. 19. (more…)

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Impetigo Skin infection: Its Causes, Prevention and Treatment

Any disintegration of skin or rupture of the skin’s surface is literally known as skin infection. Normally, different types of microorganisms are responsible for various skin conditions or skin infections. Usual infection-causing pathogens are bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites.  

A pathogen from a particular category of microbes causes a particular type of skin disease. Ringworm, impetigo, folliculitis and cellulitis are most common skin conditions. Impetigo is sort of a very dangerous skin ailment that leads to very complicated stages further. Let’s find out what is Impetigo and symptoms to identify Impetigo.  (more…)

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Wildlife Die-Offs are Relatively Common, Recent Bird Deaths Caused by Impact Trauma

Large wildlife die-off events are fairly common, though they should never be ignored, according to the U.S. Geological Survey scientists whose preliminary tests showed that the bird deaths in Arkansas on New Year’s Eve and those in Louisiana were caused by impact trauma. 

Preliminary findings from the USGS National Wildlife Health Center’s Arkansas bird analyses suggest that the birds died from impact trauma, and these findings are consistent with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s statement. The State concluded that such trauma was probably a result of the birds being startled by loud noises on the night of Dec. 31, arousing them and causing them to fly into objects such as houses or trees. Scientists at the USGS NWHC performed necropsies—the animal version of an autopsy—on the birds and found internal hemorrhaging, while the pesticide tests they conducted were negative. Results from further laboratory tests are expected to be completed in 2-3 weeks.  (more…)

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