Tag Archives: pain

Data suggest new class of drug may be potent against genital herpes

A new drug, called pritelivir, may offer a new treatment option for patients with genital herpes, a new industry-sponsored – study led by University of Washington researchers has found.

The study appears in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The lead author is Anna Wald, M.D., professor  of medicine, epidemiology, and laboratory medicine, and medical director at the Virology Research Clinic at the University of Washington. Other UW coauthors include Dr. Amalia Magaret, Dr. Christine Johnston, Dr. Lawrence Corey, Dr. Meei-Li Huang and Stacy Selke. (more…)

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Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

AUSTIN, Texas — The painful, potentially deadly stings of bark scorpions are nothing more than a slight nuisance to grasshopper mice, which voraciously kill and consume their prey with ease. When stung, the mice briefly lick their paws and move in again for the kill.

The grasshopper mice are essentially numb to the pain, scientists have found, because the scorpion toxin acts as an analgesic rather than a pain stimulant. (more…)

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Helping Patients Navigate New Cancer Drugs

As cancer treatment in pill form transforms how care is delivered, a new Michigan State University study underscores the challenges patients face in administering their own chemotherapy outside the supervised environment of a cancer clinic.

Chemotherapy pills can target specific cancers better than some traditional intravenous drugs, said Sandra Spoelstra, the MSU assistant professor of nursing who led the study. But they also can be difficult for patients to take. (more…)

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New Mobile App Helps Migraine Sufferers Track and Analyze Pain

ANN ARBOR — A new iPhone app developed at the University of Michigan lets migraine or facial pain patients easily track and record their pain, which in turn helps the treating clinician develop a pain management plan.

Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, director of the Headache & Orofacial Pain Effort (H.O.P.E.) at the U-M School of Dentistry and one of the project developers, said the app will help people with migraine, temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and other types of facial nerve pain. (more…)

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Good Intentions Ease Pain, Add to Pleasure: UMD Study

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — A nurse’s tender loving care really does ease the pain of a medical procedure, and grandma’s cookies really do taste better, if we perceive them to be made with love – suggests newly published research by a University of Maryland psychologist. The findings have many real-world applications, including in medicine, relationships, parenting and business.

“The way we read another person’s intentions changes our physical experience of the world,” says UMD Assistant Professor Kurt Gray, author of “The Power of Good Intentions,” newly published online ahead of print in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. Gray directs the Maryland Mind Perception and Morality Lab. (more…)

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Crossing Your Arms Relieves Pain

Crossing your arms reduces the intensity of pain you feel when receiving a painful stimulus on the hand, according to research by scientists at UCL.

Published in the current issue of the journal PAIN, the research shows that crossing your arms over the midline (an imaginary line running vertically down the centre of the body) confuses the brain and reduces the intensity of the pain sensation. (more…)

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Switch off Enzyme to Control Chronic Pain, say U of T Researchers

*New drug shows promise for treating chronic pain*

A team of researchers at the University of Toronto has developed a new drug targeted at parts of the brain and spinal cord associated with pain perception, which may more effectively control chronic pain caused by nerve injuries.

In a paper published Jan. 12 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, a team led by Professor Min Zhuo of the Department of Physiology and Centre for the Study of Pain, the Canada Research Chair in Pain and Cognition, showed that a new drug called NB001 produced powerful pain-killing effects in mice and in human neuronal cell lines. (more…)

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What Zen Meditators Don’t Think About Won’t Hurt Them

Zen meditation has many health benefits, including a reduced sensitivity to pain. According to new research from the Université de Montréal, meditators do feel pain but they simply don’t dwell on it as much. These findings, published in the month’s issue of Pain, may have implications for chronic pain sufferers, such as those with arthritis, back pain or cancer.

“Our previous research found that Zen meditators have lower pain sensitivity. The aim of the current study was to determine how they are achieving this,” says senior author Pierre Rainville, researcher at the Université de Montréal and the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal. “Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we demonstrated that although the meditators were aware of the pain, this sensation wasn’t processed in the part of their brains responsible for appraisal, reasoning or memory formation. We think that they feel the sensations, but cut the process short, refraining from interpretation or labelling of the stimuli as painful.” (more…)

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