Tag Archives: cape town

Attraktive Innenstadtlage beschert Turmfalken eine böse Überraschung

Das Leben in der Innenstadt ist für Turmfalken eine “ökologische Falle”. Durch attraktive Nistplätze in Wiens Altbauten angezogen, kämpfen Turmfalken mit Nahrungsmangel. Dies fand ein Team um die Zoologin Petra Sumasgutner von der Universität Wien heraus. Im Rahmen einer Studie wurden über 400 Turmfalken-Nester in Wien über Jahre beobachtet. Ergebnis: Die Nachkommen der in der Innenstadt brütenden Turmfalken haben weniger Überlebenschancen, weil es an tagaktiven Beutetieren mangelt. Aktuell erschien dazu eine Publikation im open access journal “Frontiers in Zoology”.

Seit 2010 wird in Wien, initiiert von der Zoologin Petra Sumasgutner, ein Turmfalkenmonitoring durchgeführt. Die vorliegende Studie gibt nun erstmals einen Überblick über das inzwischen umfangreich gesammelte Datenmaterial, und es konnten Rückschlüsse auf die Brutbiologie der Tiere in der Stadt gemacht werden. (more…)

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Sail Far and Wide from New York City

New York is a hub. This city has served as a focal point for so many things American, from fashion to publishing to bagels and so much more. Now the “city that never sleeps” is becoming a hub for cruise travel. You can now cruise around the world, right from New York.

Here are four major destinations that you can discover on a cruise from New York.

  • Europe – Set sail for a European adventure on a transatlantic cruise. This sailing has old world charm, as you cross the ocean like many immigrants did generations ago, to experience the new world and embark upon a new life. You can trace back your ancestor’s routes and see the precious places they came from. (more…)

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Scientists Find Oldest Dinosaur – or Closest Relative Yet

Researchers have discovered what may be the earliest dinosaur, a creature the size of a Labrador retriever, but with a five foot-long tail, that walked the Earth about 10 million years before more familiar dinosaurs like the small, swift-footed Eoraptor and Herrerasaurus.

The findings mean that the dinosaur lineage appeared 10 million to 15 million years earlier than fossils previously showed, originating in the Middle Triassic rather than in the Late Triassic period. (more…)

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Archaeologists Identify Spear Tips Used In Hunting a Half-Million Years Ago

Findings suggest hunting with stone-tipped spears began much earlier than previously believed

TORONTO, ON – A University of Toronto-led team of anthropologists has found evidence that human ancestors used stone-tipped weapons for hunting 500,000 years ago – 200,000 years earlier than previously thought.

“This changes the way we think about early human adaptations and capacities before the origin of our own species,” says Jayne Wilkins, a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and lead author of a new study in Science. “Although both Neandertals and humans used stone-tipped spears, this is the first evidence that the technology originated prior to or near the divergence of these two species,” says Wilkins. (more…)

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Combating Global Problems at BIARI

Some 140 participants and 30 visiting faculty from more than 45 countries arrived at Brown to take part in the Brown International Advanced Research Institutes (BIARI). The two-week program began June 11, 2012.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Some 140 participants and 30 visiting faculty from more than 45 countries arrived at Brown to take part in the Brown International Advanced Research Institutes (BIARI). Participants, who were chosen from a pool of more than 850 applicants, come from several countries, including Brazil, China, Nigeria, India, and Ethiopia.

The two-week program began Monday, June 11, 2012. Now in its fourth year, BIARI is centered around four two-week intensive institutes, convened concurrently by Brown faculty, in which participants and leading scholars in their fields share their research and develop new collaborative projects through sustained, high-level dialogue spanning disciplines and continents. This year’s institutes touched on global health and HIV/AIDS; theater and civil society; population and development; and climate change. (more…)

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Report Captures Picture of Global Opportunity Divide for Largest Youth Population in History

*Youths echo findings from International Youth Foundation report, which urges actions to help young people succeed.*

REDMOND, Wash. — March 27, 2012 — The numbers are staggering: Our planet has the largest youth population ever, with more than 1 billion people aged 15 to 24, and the figure is racing to 1.5 billion by 2035, according to “Opportunity for Action,” a new report being released today from the International Youth Foundation (IYF). The report shows that while some youths are succeeding, millions of others are not because they don’t have access to the necessary education, skills and opportunities.

Microsoft commissioned the “Opportunity for Action” report to bring attention to the urgency of the global youth opportunity divide — the gap between those who have access to a good education and the technology, skills and connections to be successful, and those who do not. No region of the world escapes the unsettling picture captured by the report. In Brazil, approximately 40 percent of firms have difficulty finding qualified staff to fill job vacancies due to low-quality education. In Asia, 70 percent of working youths are engaged in the agricultural sector, where jobs are seasonal and offer no protections or access to safety nets. And in sub-Saharan Africa, youths are grossly under-employed, leaving 72 percent of young people living on less than two dollars per day. (more…)

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