Tag Archives: prostate

Light therapy effectively treats early prostate cancer

A new non-surgical treatment for low-risk prostate cancer can effectively kill cancer cells while preserving healthy tissue, reports a new UCL-led phase III clinical trial in 413 patients. The trial was funded by STEBA Biotech which holds the commercial license for the treatment. (more…)

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Gold Nanoparticles Could Treat Prostate Cancer With Fewer Side Effects than Chemotherapy, MU Researchers Find

In new study published in PNAS, scientists found that nanoparticles, produced from chemicals in tea, reduced tumors by 80 percent.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Currently, large doses of chemotherapy are required when treating certain forms of cancer, resulting in toxic side effects. The chemicals enter the body and work to destroy or shrink the tumor, but also harm vital organs and drastically affect bodily functions. Now, University of Missouri scientists have found a more efficient way of targeting prostate tumors by using gold nanoparticles and a compound found in tea leaves. This new treatment would require doses that are thousands of times smaller than chemotherapy and do not travel through the body inflicting damage to healthy areas. The study is being published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (more…)

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You Are What You Eat: Low-Fat Diet with Fish Oil Slows Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells

Men who ate a low-fat diet with fish oil supplements for four to six weeks before having their prostate removed had slower cancer-cell growth in their prostate tissue than men who ate a traditional, high-fat Western diet, according to a study by researchers at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The researchers also found a change in the composition of cell membranes in both healthy cells and cancer cells in the prostates of men on the low-fat, fish oil–supplement diet. The membranes had heightened levels of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil and decreased levels of omega-6 fatty acids from corn oil, which may directly affect the biology of the cells, though further studies are needed, said Dr. William Aronson, the study’s first author and a researcher with the Jonsson Cancer Center. (more…)

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Researchers Develop System that Finds Prostate Cancer Metastases Earlier

Researchers at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a way to image the spread of a dangerous form of prostate cancer earlier than today’s conventional imaging techniques. The new method may allow oncologists to find and treat metastases more quickly and give patients a better chance at survival.

The gene-based imaging system targets castration-resistant prostate cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that has become resistant to the hormone treatment known as androgen-deprivation therapy. Once this treatment no longer works, the cancer will progress within 12 to 18 months, and the prognosis becomes grim, said senior study author Dr. Lily Wu, a professor of molecular and medical pharmacology and a Jonsson Cancer Center researcher. (more…)

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More Sun Safety: A Young Woman’s Battle Against Melanoma

Cases of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, are rising dramatically, despite the known link to outdoor or indoor exposure to ultraviolet rays. In fact, it is expected that more new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined.

“Skin cancer is the most preventable cancer, but because many people still don’t understand the dangers of the sun and indoor tanning machines, melanoma has become one of the most common cancers among young adults,” says Dr. David J. Leffell, CEO of Yale Medical Group, a member of Yale Cancer Center and chief of dermatologic surgery and cutaneous oncology at Yale School of Medicine. (more…)

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Prostate Cancer Spreads to Bones by Overtaking The Home of Blood Stem Cells

ANN ARBOR, Mich.— Like bad neighbors who decide to go wreck another community, prostate and breast cancer usually recur in the bone, according to a new University of Michigan study.

Now, U-M researchers believe they know why. Prostate cancer cells specifically target and eventually overrun the bone marrow niche, a specialized area for hematopoietic stem cells, which make red and white blood cells, said Russell Taichman, professor at the U-M School of Dentistry and senior author of the study. (more…)

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