Tag Archives: body parts

Brilliant 10

UD alumnus one of Popular Science magazine’s ‘Brilliant 10’ Young Scientists

University of Delaware alumnus Deva Ramanan has been named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10” Young Scientists.

The designation places Ramanan on the magazine’s annual “honor roll” of the 10 most promising scientist for 2012.

Ramanan, who earned his bachelor’s degree in computer engineering at UD in 2000, is an associate professor of computer science at the University of California Irvine (UCI). There he is working to improve a computer’s image recognition capability, or in simpler terms, a computer’s ability to “see people.” (more…)

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Growing Market for Human Organs Exploits Poor

EAST LANSING, Mich. — A Michigan State University anthropologist who spent more than a year infiltrating the black market for human kidneys has published the first in-depth study describing the often horrific experiences of poor people who were victims of organ trafficking.

Monir Moniruzzaman interviewed 33 kidney sellers in his native Bangladesh and found they typically didn’t get the money they were promised and were plagued with serious health problems that prevented them from working, shame and depression. (more…)

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Researcher Explains How Santa Delivers Presents in One Night

Don’t believe in Santa Claus? Magic, you say? In fact, science and technology explain how Santa is able to deliver toys to good girls and boys around the world in one night, according to a North Carolina State University researcher.

NC State’s Dr. Larry Silverberg, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, can explain the science and engineering principles that allow Santa, also known as Kris Kringle or Saint Nicholas, to pull off the magical feat year after year. (more…)

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Research Sheds New Light on Body Parts’ Sensitivity to Environmental Changes

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Research by a team of Michigan State University scientists has shed new light on why some body parts are more sensitive to environmental change than others, work that could someday lead to better ways of treating a variety of diseases, including Type-2 diabetes.

The research, led by assistant zoology professor Alexander Shingleton, is detailed in the recent issue of the Proceedings of the Library of Science Genetics. (more…)

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