Tag Archives: quebec

China: the return of Confucius

Everywhere in China, even in Beijing’s iconic Tiananmen Square, statues of the great Chinese revolutionary heroes have often been replaced by those of Confucius, a sign that the master‘s school of thought has indeed been restored by the authorities.

What for centuries was the official face of Chinese civilization, before being rejected by the revolutionaries of the 20th century, has indeed made a return in recent years. (more…)

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Vorgestellt: Wie lebt man in Lampedusa?

Gilles Reckinger, neuberufener Professor für Interkulturelle Kommunikations- und Risikoforschung, interessiert sich besonders für das Leben an der Grenze, die Arbeitswelt und Prekarisierungsprozesse sowie für Jungendforschung. Ein großes Anliegen ist ihm die verborgene und unsichtbare Seite der Migration. Seine Professur wurde von der Stiftung Südtiroler Sparkasse gestiftet.

„Wie lebt man in Lampedusa?“ Diese scheinbar simple Fragestellung hat Gilles Reckinger ins Zentrum seiner Forschungsinteressen der letzten Jahre gestellt. Seine Faszination für diese Insel ist bereits als Jugendlicher entstanden. Mit der Unterzeichnung des Vertrags von Maastricht und dem Schengener Abkommen lotete der Forscher die Außengrenzen Europas mit dem Finger auf der Landkarte aus. Die Möglichkeit, die südlichste Insel Italiens ohne Pass bereisen zu können, weckte schon damals seine Neugierde. Nachdem Gilles Reckinger die medialen Berichterstattungen über Lampedusa mitverfolgt hat, entschloss er sich im Jahr 2009 zu einer Forschungsreise auf diese Insel aufzubrechen. Gemeinsam mit seiner Frau und einer Videokünstlerin stellte er schnell fest, dass die Insel vollkommen anders ist, als sie in der Öffentlichkeit dargestellt wird. (more…)

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Television: Chronicle of a Death Foretold?

Not only is TV not endangered, but it also has a unifying social impact on the nuclear family across the country. This is the main conclusion of a cross-Canada study—Are the Kids All Right?on the television viewing habits of families with at least one child aged between 9 and 12 years. The study was conducted by a team of researchers led by André H. Caron, professor of communications at the Université de Montréal and Director of the Centre for Youth and Media Studies (CYMS).

“Young Canadians today live in a different world than that experienced by previous generations. In this context, many well-placed observers have predicted the impending death of television,” says Dr. Caron. “We wanted to test the veracity of this statement, so we set out to meet 80 different families (over 200 participants) to determine the current place of the small screen that has shaped so many childhoods since its creation.” (more…)

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Africa’s Female Students Are Fighters and Survivors

The education of girls in developing countries is lagging by at least 30 years in comparison to the education of girls in developed countries. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where only a minority of women get a university education. Why does this disparity still exist today?

Valèse Mapto Kengne obtained her diploma last spring from the Université de Montréal Faculty of Education where she devoted her thesis to answering that very question. “I wanted to know the truth behind the numbers. Why do some girls drop out? And contrarily, what drives the others to persevere? (more…)

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New Computer Programme Promises To Save The Whales

Researchers at the University of Montreal have developed a computer programme that enables regulators to evaluate the ecological and economic tradeoffs between marine mammal conservation, whale watching and marine transportation activities in the Saint Lawrence Estuary.

“The objective is to reduce the collision risk with whales while taking into account the impact on industry and marine transportation,” said Lael Parrott, who headed the research team. The model, developed in her Complex Systems Laboratory, maps the estuary where the field research was undertaken, simulates the comings and goings of five mammal species (minke whale, fin whale, beluga, humpback and blue whale), the presence and movements of three types of boats (recreation, excursion and cargo), and environmental conditions. Nine scenarios were elaborated in order to observe the effects of various decisions. (more…)

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Up in Smoke: Quebec Prison Partial Smoking Ban is not Successful

The partial smoking ban in Quebec prisons is leading to a slew of new problems according to an investigative study involving the Université de Montréal. Their findings, part of a report conducted by the Institut National de Santé Publique, show that the courtyard-only policy for smoking has not led to quitting but rather to tension in the prison and cigarette-based economy. (more…)

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Global Warming Could Spell Disaster for Corn Crops

If corn producers continue using the same cultivars, plants selected for their desirable characteristics, global warming could cause production to drop from 1.3 to 10 percent between 2010 and 2039.

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New Study Shows How Tortoises, Alligators Thrived in High Arctic Some 50 Million Years Ago

A new study of the High Arctic climate roughly 50 million years ago led by the University of Colorado at Boulder helps to explain how ancient alligators and giant tortoises were able to thrive on Ellesmere Island well above the Arctic Circle, even as they endured six months of darkness each year.

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