Tag Archives: amyloid plaques

Research Resilience: Disappointing Alzheimer’s trial yields new ideas

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine documents the high-profile failure of a promising drug, bapineuzumab, to slow cognitive decline in dementia patients. Dr. Stephen Salloway, the study’s lead author, says researchers have learned key lessons that they are eager to apply in new attempts to find effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Dr. Stephen Salloway pulls no punches in describing the results of two clinical trials of the Alzheimer’s drug bapineuzumab that he helped to lead. The antibody failed to produce cognitive improvement for volunteers compared to a placebo, he and colleagues report Jan. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine. (more…)

Read More

Vitamin D, Omega-3 May Help Clear Amyloid Plaques Found in Alzheimer’s

A team of academic researchers has pinpointed how vitamin D3 and omega-3 fatty acids may enhance the immune system’s ability to clear the brain of amyloid plaques, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease.

In a small pilot study published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the scientists identified key genes and signaling networks regulated by vitamin D3 and the omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) that may help control inflammation and improve plaque clearance. (more…)

Read More

A Better Way to Culture Central Nervous Cells

A protein associated with neuron damage in Alzheimer’s patients provides a superior scaffold for growing central nervous system cells in the lab. The findings could have clinical implications for producing neural implants and offers new insights on the complex link between the apoE4 apolipoprotein and Alzheimer’s disease. Results appear in the journal Biomaterials.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — A protein associated with neuron damage in people with Alzheimer’s disease is surprisingly useful in promoting neuron growth in the lab, according to a new study by engineering researchers at Brown University. The findings, in press at the journal Biomaterials, suggest a better method of growing neurons outside the body that might then be implanted to treat people with neurodegenerative diseases. (more…)

Read More