Tag Archives: adults

Sleeping on the job? Actually, that’s a good thing

ANN ARBOR — Employees seeking to boost their productivity at work should take a nap—yes, sleeping on the job can be a good thing.

A new University of Michigan study finds that taking a nap may be an effective strategy to counteract impulsive behavior and to boost tolerance for frustration. (more…)

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Teens Still Sending Naked Selfies

A new study from the University of Utah confirms that substantial numbers of teens are sexting – sending and receiving explicit sexual images via cellphone. Though the behavior is widely studied, the potentially serious consequences of the practice led the researchers to more accurately measure how frequently teens are choosing to put themselves at risk in this fashion. (more…)

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MU Researchers Identify Risk-Factors for Addictive Video-Game Use among Adults

Escapism, social interaction and rewards fuel problematic gaming behaviors

COLUMBIA, Mo. – New research from the University of Missouri indicates escapism, social interaction and rewards fuel problematic video-game use among “very casual” to “hardcore” adult gamers. Understanding individual motives that contribute to unhealthy game play could help counselors identify and treat individuals addicted to video games.

“The biggest risk factor for pathological video game use seems to be playing games to escape from daily life,” said Joe Hilgard, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychological Sciences in the MU College of Arts and Science. “Individuals who play games to get away from their lives or to pretend to be other people seem to be those most at-risk for becoming part of a vicious cycle. These gamers avoid their problems by playing games, which in turn interferes with their lives because they’re so busy playing games.” (more…)

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Diabetes Study: ‘Mindful Eating’ Equals Traditional Education In Lowering Weight and Blood Sugar

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Eating mindfully, or consuming food in response to physical cues of hunger and fullness, is just as effective as adhering to nutrition-based guidelines in reducing weight and blood sugar levels in adults with Type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

In a comparison study of the effectiveness of the two types of behavioral interventions, participants lost about the same amount of weight – an average of between 3 1/2 and 6 pounds – and lowered their long-term blood sugar levels significantly after three months.

One treatment group followed an established diabetes self-management education program, with a strong emphasis on nutrition information. The other group was trained in mindful meditation and a mindful approach to food selection and eating. Both interventions, involving weekly group meetings, also recommended physical activity. (more…)

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Preschoolers’ Counting Abilities Relate to Future Math Performance, MU Researcher Says

Counting, in addition to reciting, should be emphasized in early childhood education to establish foundation for future academic success

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Along with reciting the days of the week and the alphabet, adults often practice reciting numbers with young children. Now, new research from the University of Missouri suggests reciting numbers is not enough to prepare children for math success in elementary school. The research indicates that counting, which requires assigning numerical values to objects in chronological order, is more important for helping preschoolers acquire math skills.

“Reciting means saying the numbers from memory in chronological order, whereas counting involves understanding that each item in the set is counted once and that the last number stated is the amount for the entire set,” said Louis Manfra, an assistant professor in MU’s Department of Human Development and Family Studies. “When children are just reciting, they’re basically repeating what seems like a memorized sentence. When they’re counting, they’re performing a more cognitive activity in which they’re associating a one-to-one correspondence with the object and the number to represent a quantity.” (more…)

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Study: An Apple a Day Lowers Level of Blood Chemical Linked to Hardening of the Arteries

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Eating an apple a day might in fact help keep the cardiologist away, new research suggests.

In a study of healthy, middle-aged adults, consumption of one apple a day for four weeks lowered by 40 percent blood levels of a substance linked to hardening of the arteries.

Taking capsules containing polyphenols, a type of antioxidant found in apples, had a similar, but not as large, effect. (more…)

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The Naked Truth: Exclusive Survey from FITNESS Magazine & Yahoo! Shine Reveals How Men & Women Really Feel about Their Bodies

*57% of Women Polled Think They Look Fat Naked;

Thighs ranked as #1 Most Hated Body Part; Cleavage ranked as #1 Body Part To Flaunt Among Women

However, 63% of adults admit to walking around their home naked*

SUNNYVALE, Calif. & NEW YORK — It’s no wonder losing weight continues to dominate New Year’s resolutions—a new survey from FITNESS Magazine and Yahoo! Shine reveals that 57% of women polled think they look fat naked and 81% of adults have a body part they hate. The exclusive survey asked 1,500 women and men to bare it all about how they feel about being naked.

The survey revealed a lack of body confidence with women more likely than men to have issues with many parts of their body, primarily their thighs (21%), while men dislike their butts the most (11%). (more…)

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Children Don’t Give Words Special Power to Categorize Their World

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New research challenges the conventional thinking that young children use language just as adults do to help classify and understand objects in the world around them.

In a new study involving 4- to 5-year-old children, researchers found that the labels adults use to classify items – words like “dog” or “pencil” – don’t have the same ability to influence the thinking of children. (more…)

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