Tag Archives: spintronics

A new way to get electricity from magnetism

‘Inverse spin Hall effect’ works in several organic semiconductors

By showing that a phenomenon dubbed the “inverse spin Hall effect” works in several organic semiconductors – including carbon-60 buckyballs – University of Utah physicists changed magnetic “spin current” into electric current. The efficiency of this new power conversion method isn’t yet known, but it might find use in future electronic devices including batteries, solar cells and computers. (more…)

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UCLA researchers create nanoscale structure for computer chips that could yield higher-performance memory

Researchers at UCLA have created a nanoscale magnetic component for computer memory chips that could significantly improve their energy efficiency and scalability.

The design brings a new and highly sought-after type of magnetic memory one step closer to being used in computers, mobile electronics such as smart phones and tablets, as well as large computing systems for big data. The innovative asymmetric structure allows it to better exploit electrons’ spin and orbital properties, making it much more power efficient than today’s computer memory. (more…)

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JQI Physicists Demonstrate Coveted ‘Spin-Orbit Coupling’ in Atomic Gases

*Technique suggests an avenue for creating new kinds of superconductivity*

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Physicists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), a collaboration of the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), have for the first time caused a gas of atoms to exhibit an important quantum phenomenon known as spin-orbit coupling. Their technique opens new possibilities for studying and better understanding fundamental physics and has potential applications to quantum computing, next-generation “spintronics” devices and even “atomtronic” devices built from ultracold atoms. 

In the researchers’ demonstration of spin-orbit coupling, two lasers allow an atom’s motion to flip it between a pair of energy states. The new work, published in Nature**, demonstrates this effect for the first time in bosons, which make up one of the two major classes of particles. The same technique could be applied to fermions, the other major class of particles, according to the researchers. The special properties of fermions would make them ideal for studying new kinds of interactions between two particles-for example those leading to novel “p-wave” superconductivity, which may enable a long-sought form of quantum computing known as topological quantum computation.  (more…)

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