Tag Archives: psychological factors

Interview with Baban Mohamed: ‘Code-switching’, a research project on Kurdish community in Austria

Baban Mohamed received his Master’s degree in English and American Studies (General/Applied Linguistics) from the University of Salzburg in Austria. He has B.A. degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Sulaimania (the Kurdistan Region of Iraq). Since 2005 Baban is living and studying in the beautiful Mozart’s City of Music, Salzburg. His research interests cover the areas of bilingual/ bicultural acquisition, child code-switching and sociolinguistics.

Q. Very recently you published research work titled: ‘Code-switching: A Case Study of Kurdish-German Pre-school Bilingual Children’ as part of European University Studies. Before going deep into your research, my first question to you: What is Bilingualism’?

Baban Mohamed: The book is a sociolinguistic research within the field of child bilingualism about the language and culture development of immigrant pre-school children, the case study of Kurdish community in Austria. The book addresses accounts of how children develop the functions and roles of different languages and how they manage to keep the language systems apart or switch from one to the other – not arbitrarily or due to a lack of competence as sometimes has been suggested but purposefully and with functions in mind.  (more…)

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Love thy neighbor: It could lower your risk of stroke

ANN ARBOR — Here’s some neighborly advice for adults over age 50: Stay friendly with your neighbors.

A new University of Michigan study shows that adults in this age bracket who live in a good neighborhood with trustworthy people lowered their risk of stroke up to 48 percent.

Feeling connected with neighbors builds what researchers describe as “neighborhood social cohesion.” The trust and connection with neighbors was associated with a reduced risk of stroke above and beyond the effects of negative psychological factors—such as depression and anxiety, said Eric Kim, a doctoral student in the U-M Department of Psychology and the study’s lead author. (more…)

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Brainwaves reflect ability to beat built-in bias

Many animals, including humans, harbor ingrained biases to act when they can obtain rewards and to remain inactive to avoid punishment. Sometimes, however those biases can steer us wrong. A new study finds that theta brainwave activity in the prefrontal cortex predicts how well people can overcome these biases when a better choice are available.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Vertebrates are predisposed to act to gain rewards and to lie low to avoid punishment. Try to teach chickens to back away from food in order to obtain it, and you’ll fail, as researchers did in 1986. But humans are better thinkers than chickens. In the May 8 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers show that the level of theta brainwave activity in the prefrontal cortex predicts whether people will be able to overcome these ingrained biases when doing so is required to achieve a goal. (more…)

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Stress at Work Very Unlikely to Cause Cancer

Work-related stress is not directly linked to the development of colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancers, but can cause other contributing factors, according to a new study published on bmj.com

Around 90 per cent of cancers are linked to environmental exposures and whilst some exposures are well recognised (such as UV radiation and tobacco smoke), others are not (psychological factors such as stress). (more…)

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