Tag Archives: france

Short lives, violent deaths: Two CT-scanned Siberian mammoth calves yield trove of insights

ANN ARBOR — CT scans of two newborn woolly mammoths recovered from the Siberian Arctic are revealing previously inaccessible details about the early development of prehistoric pachyderms. In addition, the X-ray images show that both creatures died from suffocation after inhaling mud.

Lyuba and Khroma, who died at ages 1 and 2 months, respectively, are the most complete and best-preserved baby mammoth specimens ever found. Lyuba’s full-body CT scan, which used an industrial scanner at a Ford testing facility in Michigan, was the first of its kind for any mammoth. (more…)

Read More

NASA Radio Delivered for Europe’s 2016 Mars Orbiter

The first of two NASA Electra radios that will fly aboard the European Space Agency’s next mission to Mars has been delivered for installation onto the ESA ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO).

The TGO is being assembled at Thales Alenia Space, in Cannes, France, for a 2016 launch opportunity. It will study the Martian atmosphere for the presence of methane and other gases that may be present in small concentrations. It will also deploy the ESA Schiaparelli Mars landing demonstration craft and provide communications support for ESA ExoMars Rover and a Russian Lander planned for launch in 2018. (more…)

Read More

Brown University Oncology Research Group: Twenty years of cancer treatment trials

Since 1994 cancer doctors affiliated with the Alpert Medical School have had a place with funding, administrative, and collegial support to develop and test novel cancer treatments: The Brown University Oncology Research Group.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Too few cancer patients, especially those with pancreatic cancer, get to the point that Raymond Sabella reached in the spring of 2014. Ten months after he began his trek from the diagnosis of an inoperable tumor to experimental chemotherapy and then radiation, he reports feeling great. He’s gaining back some of the weight he lost, but not too much, and something else is back, too. (more…)

Read More

Report shows lack of knowledge about World War One’s global impact

A widespread lack of understanding of the global scale and impact of the First World War has been revealed in a new report. Research by the British Council in the UK and six other countries shows that knowledge of the conflict – which began 100 years ago – is largely limited to the fighting on the Western Front.

University of Exeter historian, Dr Catriona Pennell, acted as historical consultant to the report ‘Remember the World as well as the War. It explores people’s perceptions and knowledge about the First World War and highlights the truly global nature of the conflict and its lasting legacy. This links closely with Dr Pennell’s various research projects, including the ‘First World War in the Classroom’, an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project that seeks to establish how the First World War is taught in English Literature and History classrooms in England, and will provide the data set that will inform the nature and content of the Institute of Education’s WW1 Centenary Battlefield Tours Project. (more…)

Read More

Germany’s economic resurgence due to decentralised wage bargaining rather than Hartz reforms: new research

The astonishing transformation of the German economy from the ‘sick man of Europe’ to a lean and highly competitive economy is predominantly due to the decentralisation of wage bargaining rather than government labour market reforms, according to new research led by UCL.

The resurgence of the German economy has often been attributed to government policy, notably the so-called ‘Hartz reforms’ implemented in 2003. But research, forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, suggests that it is instead down to the inherent flexibility of the German system of industrial relations – most specifically, the autonomy of labour market institutions to set wage rates – that has led to a dramatic increase in the competitiveness of the German economy. (more…)

Read More

‘Life as Research Scientist’: Romain Fleury, Engineer

Due to deep passion for physics, Romain Fleury, after completion of his engineering diploma in France, joined the research group of Prof. Andrea Alù at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is currently pursuing a Ph.D degree. His research focuses on metamaterials, a new branch of science and technology that is making its way to maturity. To know and understand details about it and further more, let’s join our latest round of Q&A with the young and aspiring scientist – Mr. Romain Fleury:

Q. Let us start with your research topic. What is your research area? Will you please tell us a bit more on this? What did you find?

Romain Fleury: I am involved in cross-disciplinary research in the general area of wave physics and engineering. This includes electromagnetic and acoustic waves, but also other types of waves such as matter waves (the probability amplitude wave associated with a quantum particle). To be more specific, my current research mainly focuses on metamaterials, which are artificial materials that are structured and engineered to interact with waves in anomalous ways, and enable exotic physical phenomena that cannot be obtained with natural materials. For example, unlike naturally occurring materials, the refractive index of some metamaterials can take very extreme values, like zero, extremely large, or even negative. Of course, metamaterials are made of natural materials, with common properties, but it is the way we mix and structure these natural building blocks that give metamaterials their new, superior properties. Metamaterials have spectacular applications, like invisibility. Part of my research is focused on studying the potentials of metamaterials for cloaking applications. (more…)

Read More

Gene therapy leads to robust improvements in animal model of fatal muscle disease

Preclinical studies show that gene therapy can improve muscle strength in small- and large-animal models of a fatal congenital childhood disease know as X-linked myotubular myopathy.

The findings, appearing  as the cover story in the January 22, 2014 issue of Science Translational Medicine, also demonstrate the feasibility of future clinical trials of gene therapy for this devastating disease. (more…)

Read More