Tag Archives: camera

Insect eye-inspired camera captures wide field of view with no distortion, according to study co-led by CU-Boulder

By mimicking the bulging, bowl-shaped eyes possessed by dragonflies, praying mantises, houseflies and other insects, a team of researchers that includes a University of Colorado Boulder engineer has built an experimental digital camera that can take exceptionally wide-angle photos without distorting the image.

To create the innovative camera, which also allows for a practically infinite depth of field, the scientists used stretchable electronics and a pliable sheet of microlenses made from a material similar to that used for contact lenses. The researchers described the camera in an article published on May 1, 2013 in the journal Nature. (more…)

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NASA Mars Rover Preparing to Drill into First Martian Rock

PASADENA, Calif. — NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity is driving toward a flat rock with pale veins that may hold clues to a wet history on the Red Planet. If the rock meets rover engineers’ approval when Curiosity rolls up to it in coming days, it will become the first to be drilled for a sample during the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

The size of a car, Curiosity is inside Mars’ Gale Crater investigating whether the planet ever offered an environment favorable for microbial life. Curiosity landed in the crater five months ago to begin its two-year prime mission. (more…)

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Curiosity Rover Nearing Yellowknife Bay

Mars Science Laboratory Mission Status Report

PASADENA, Calif. –– The NASA Mars rover Curiosity drove 63 feet (19 meters) northeastward early Monday, Dec. 10, approaching a step down into a slightly lower area called “Yellowknife Bay,” where researchers intend to choose a rock to drill.

The drive was Curiosity’s fourth consecutive driving day since leaving a site near an outcrop called “Point Lake,” where it arrived last month. These drives totaled 260 feet (79 meters) and brought the mission’s total odometry to 0.37 mile (598 meters). (more…)

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Top 5 Advantages of Sixth Sense Technology

Sixth Sense Technology is made up of several parts like pocket projector, camera, and mirror. All these are connected together to one mobile computer device. The device made from Sixth Sense Technology is extremely portable and can be worn around the neck. There are several benefits of Sixth Sense Technology. Let’s have a look at the top 5.

Number 1:

Sixth Sense features a certain user guide that is extremely simple to use. There are several important gestures that people can easily learn without even going through rigorous tutorials. These gestures include taking a photo, or making a call over phone, or even trying to check out the time.To take a photo snap, the user need to simply make a hand gesture in the air that feels like a rectangle. With this simple gesture, the picture will get snapped. Yes, this is what Sixth Sense Technology is all about. The snapped picture will be stored carefully in the device’s memory card. User will always have direct access to the picture whenever he/she wants to edit it. The user can easily resize the image and carry out editing simply with the help of some finger motions over the projected screen. (more…)

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Freezing Electrons in Flight

Using the world’s fastest laser pulses, which can freeze the ultrafast motion of electrons and atoms, UA physicists have caught the action of molecules breaking apart and electrons getting knocked out of atoms. Their research helps us better understand molecular processes and ultimately be able to control them in many possible applications.

In 1878, a now iconic series of photographs instantly solved a long-standing mystery: Does a galloping horse touch the ground at all times? (It doesn’t.) The images of Eadweard Muybridge taken alongside a racetrack marked the beginning of high-speed photography.

Approximately 134 years later, researchers in the University of Arizona department of physics have solved a similar mystery, one in which super-excited oxygen molecules have replaced the horse, and ultrafast, high-energy laser flashes have replaced Muybridge’s photo emulsion plates. (more…)

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World’s Most Powerful Digital Camera Begins Hunt for Dark Energy

Eight billion years ago, rays of light from distant galaxies began their long journey to Earth. That ancient starlight has now found its way to a mountaintop in Chile, where the newly constructed Dark Energy Camera, the most powerful sky-mapping machine ever created, has captured and recorded it for the first time.

That light may hold within it the answer to one of the biggest mysteries in physics: Why the expansion of the universe is speeding up. (more…)

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Design Eye For The Science Guy: Drop-in Clinic Helps Scientists Communicate Data

Some of the figures scientists create are stunning. Others are not – mismatched fonts, poorly aligned tables, clashing colors.  Many fall somewhere in between. A deluge of data presents a challenge to amateur designers, often resulting in a cluttered presentation that can crowd out the figure’s main message.

A group of University of Washington researchers has launched a unique experiment matching science students with those in design. The new Design Help Desk, similar to a writing help desk, offers scientists a chance to meet with someone who can help them create more effective figures, tables and graphs. (more…)

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MU Engineers Developing Military Applications for Smartphones

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Tracking military targets? The University of Missouri’s College of Engineering has an app for that.

Engineers from the MU College of Engineering, with funding from the U.S. Army/Leonard Wood Institute, have enhanced popular smartphones to be able to find and track targets. In addition, the engineers have developed ad hoc networks so that soldiers can relay smartphone information without using the internet. (more…)

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