BlogArena

General blog about anything and everything of everyday's life.

December 16, 2016
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Earthquakes, ‘Marsquakes,’ and the possibility of life

A new study shows that rocks formed by the grinding together of other rocks during earthquakes are rich in trapped hydrogen — a finding that suggests similar seismic activity on Mars may produce enough hydrogen to support life.

August 12, 2015
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Where does water go when it doesn’t flow?

Study shows how much enters air from plants, soil, surface water More than a quarter of the rain and snow that falls on continents reaches the oceans as runoff. Now a new study helps show where the rest goes: two-thirds … Continue reading

December 31, 2014
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NASA Data Underscore Severity of California Drought

It will take about 11 trillion gallons of water (42 cubic kilometers) — around 1.5 times the maximum volume of the largest U.S. reservoir — to recover from California’s continuing drought, according to a new analysis of NASA satellite data.

October 3, 2013
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Legacy Soil Pollution: Higher lead levels may lie just below surface

A study of data from hundreds of soil samples taken around six old water tower sites in southern Rhode Island finds that even when lead levels on the surface are low, concentrations can sometimes be greater at depths down to … Continue reading

June 8, 2013
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Northern hemisphere losing last dry snow region, says CU study

Last July, something unprecedented in the 34-year satellite record happened: 98 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet’s surface melted, compared to roughly 50 percent during an average summer. Snow that usually stays frozen and dry turned wet with melt water. … Continue reading

May 30, 2013
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Moth-Inspired Nanostructures Take the Color Out of Thin Films

Inspired by the structure of moth eyes, researchers at North Carolina State University have developed nanostructures that limit reflection at the interfaces where two thin films meet, suppressing the “thin-film interference” phenomenon commonly observed in nature. This can potentially improve … Continue reading

March 30, 2013
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True colors of some fossil feathers now in doubt

Geological processes can affect evidence of the original colors of fossil feathers, according to new research by Yale University scientists, who said some previous reconstructions of fossil bird and dinosaur feather colors may now merit revision. The discovery reveals how … Continue reading

March 25, 2013
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Dead Forests Release Less Carbon Into Atmosphere Than Expected

Billions of trees killed in the wake of mountain pine beetle infestations, ranging from Mexico to Alaska, have not resulted in a large spike in carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, contrary to predictions, a UA-led study has found. Massive … Continue reading