BlogArena

General blog about anything and everything of everyday's life.

17. Oct 2019

December 11, 2017
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Scientist Haifan Lin: From Mao’s China to Yale’s Stem Cell Center

Scientist’s journey includes moving research toward potential clinical advances A significant turning point in the life of Haifan Lin, Ph.D., Eugene Higgins Professor of Cell Biology; professor of genetics and of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences; and founding director of … Continue reading

September 20, 2017
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In the Age of Social Media, He’s a New Kind of Scientist

What does it mean to be a scientist? Far more than doing research in a lab, says Michael Johnson, whose unconventional passage into the field began with a bowling championship and a music degree. “Think of it basically like a … Continue reading

September 2, 2014
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In conversation: scientist Ruth Blake on life aboard the E/V Nautilus

Yale geology and geophysics professor Ruth Blake recently completed a tour of duty as lead scientist aboard the exploration vessel Nautilus, during the Windward Passage leg of the ship’s 2014 exploration season. The Windward Passage is the body of water … Continue reading

February 8, 2014
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Neanderthal lineages excavated from modern human genomes

A substantial fraction of the Neanderthal genome persists in modern human populations. A new approach applied to analyzing whole-genome sequencing data from 665 people from Europe and East Asia shows that more than 20 percent of the Neanderthal genome survives … Continue reading

November 18, 2013
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Scientists “Burst” Supercomputing Record with Bubble Collapse Simulation; Could Lead to Advances in Healthcare and Industrial Technology

– 15,000 bubbles are simulated using IBM BlueGene/Q “Sequoia” at 14.4 Petaflop of sustained performance, a 150-fold improvement over current state-of-the-art – Destructive capabilities of collapsing bubbles are increasingly being studied in areas ranging from treating kidney stones and cancer … Continue reading

October 9, 2013
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Poetry is like music to the mind, scientists prove

New brain imaging technology is helping researchers to bridge the gap between art and science by mapping the different ways in which the brain responds to poetry and prose. Scientists at the University of Exeter used state-of-the-art functional magnetic resonance … Continue reading

April 25, 2013
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Cutting Specific Atmospheric Pollutants Would Slow Sea Level Rise

Decreasing emissions of black carbon, methane and other pollutants makes a difference With coastal areas bracing for rising sea levels, new research indicates that cutting emissions of certain pollutants can greatly slow sea level rise this century. Scientists found that … Continue reading