BlogArena

General blog about anything and everything of everyday's life.

04. Apr 2020

May 29, 2014
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Guilty: Crabs are killing N.E. saltmarshes

Two newly published studies by a team of Brown University researchers provide ample new evidence that the reason coastal saltmarshes are dying from Long Island to Cape Cod is that hungry crabs, left unchecked by a lack of predators, are … Continue reading

April 15, 2013
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Invasive crabs help Cape Cod marshes

Ecologists are wary of non-native species, but along the shores of Cape Cod where grass-eating crabs have been running amok and destroying the marsh, an invasion of a predatory green crabs has helped turn back the tide in favor of … Continue reading

February 5, 2013
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Confirmed: Stress Gradient Hypothesis: How Plant Communities Endure Stress

The Stress Gradient Hypothesis holds that as stress increases in an ecosystem, mutually supportive interactions become more significant and negative interactions, such as competition, become less so. The idea has been hotly debated but is now backed by a review … Continue reading

January 29, 2013
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Student’s Curiosity Produces Ecological Buzz

Students studying what they love is a well-established principle at Brown. For Tyler Coverdale, that meant the outdoors, the environment, and, ultimately, some provocative research on Cape Cod salt marshes through GIS-assisted analysis of historical aerial photography. He loves it. … Continue reading

June 18, 2012
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Recreational Fishing Brings Salt Marsh Die-Off

As recreational fishing activity has reduced predators in many of Cape Cod’s salt marsh ecosystems, Sesarma crabs have feasted on grasses, causing dramatic die-offs of the marshes, according to a new study. The researchers assessed the “trophic cascade” in several … Continue reading

May 14, 2012
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Five-Limbed Brittle Stars Move Bilaterally, Like People

Brittle stars and people have something in common: They move in fundamentally similar ways. Though not bilaterally symmetrical like humans and many other animals, brittle stars have come up with a mechanism to choose any of its five limbs to … Continue reading