BlogArena

General blog about anything and everything of everyday's life.

19. Aug 2019

August 5, 2013
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Study Identifies Deepwater Horizon Debris as Likely Source of Gulf of Mexico Oil Sheens

A chemical analysis of oil sheens found floating recently at the ocean’s surface near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster indicates that the source is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig. Both the Macondo … Continue reading

September 4, 2012
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Tracking Fish Through a Coral Reef Seascape

Ear-bone ‘tree rings’ provide evidence of connectivity Ocean scientists have long known that juvenile coral reef fishes use coastal seagrass and mangrove habitats as nurseries, later moving as adults onto coral reefs. But the fishes’ movements, and the connections between … Continue reading

May 4, 2012
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Science Fair Winner Publishes New Study on Butterfly Foraging Behavior

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida lepidopterist Andrei Sourakov has spent his life’s work studying moths and butterflies. But it was his teenage daughter, Alexandra, who led research on how color impacts butterflies’ feeding patterns. The research shows different species … Continue reading

March 27, 2012
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Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill’s Effects on Deep-Water Corals

*Damaged deep-sea corals discovered months after Deepwater Horizon spill* Scientists are reporting new evidence that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill has affected marine life in the Gulf of Mexico, this time species that live in dark ocean depths–deepwater corals. The … Continue reading

December 29, 2011
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Cockroach Hookup Signal Could Benefit Endangered Woodpecker

A North Carolina State University discovery of the unique chemical composition of a cockroach signal – a “Let’s hook up” sex pheromone emitted by certain female wood cockroaches to entice potential mates – could have far-ranging benefits, including improved conservation … Continue reading

October 27, 2011
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Printed Protection: Low-cost Paper-based Wireless Sensor Could Help Detect Explosive Devices

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a prototype wireless sensor capable of detecting trace amounts of a key ingredient found in many explosives. The device, which employs carbon nanotubes and is printed on paper or paper-like material … Continue reading