BlogArena

General blog about anything and everything of everyday's life.

April 22, 2014
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Cotsen researcher finds evidence of ‘unnatural selection’ in popular Panamanian seafood

Caribbean fighting conch used to be harvested with more meat, but evolved to mature at smaller size Like most residents of Panama’s Isla Colón, UCLA archaeologist Thomas Wake has enjoyed more than a few plates of Caribbean fighting conch in … Continue reading

August 11, 2013
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Oldest European fort in the inland US discovered in Appalachians

ANN ARBOR — The remains of the earliest European fort in the interior of what is now the United States have been discovered by a team of archaeologists, providing new insight into the start of the U.S. colonial era and … Continue reading

January 18, 2013
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Searching for the Lost Royal City of Nubia in Northern Sudan

ANN ARBOR — Geoff Emberling is doing what few archaeologists do anymore in a world that has been worked over pretty well by picks, trowels and shovels. He’s searching for a lost royal city. The ancient capital was ruled by … Continue reading

January 17, 2013
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4,000-year-old Shaman’s Stones Discovered near Boquete, Panama

Archaeologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama have discovered a cluster of 12 unusual stones in the back of a small, prehistoric rock-shelter near the town of Boquete. The cache represents the earliest material evidence of shamanistic … Continue reading

June 5, 2012
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Ceramics Tell the Story of an Ancient Southwest Migration

Another look at a nearly 80-year-old pottery collection at the Arizona State Museum is yielding new information about migrants who abandoned the Four Corners region. Approximately eight centuries ago, people living along the Colorado Plateau in what is now the … Continue reading

April 14, 2012
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800-Year-Old Farmers Could Teach Us How to Protect The Amazon

In the face of mass deforestation of the Amazon, we could learn from its earliest inhabitants who managed their farmland sustainably. Research from an international team of archaeologists and paleoecologists, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of … Continue reading

February 28, 2012
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New Book Details Archaeological Excavations on San Juan Island

It’s a powerful feeling, says anthropology graduate student Amanda Taylor, to stand where people stood thousands of years back and gaze out at the same water — the same sunsets — that they saw so long ago. “Maybe you reach … Continue reading

November 26, 2011
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Laborers of Love

*Three volunteers who make a difference* A murmur runs through the audience as Bob Kriel withdraws his gloved hand from a darkened cage in the front of a small lecture room. On the glove sits Bubo, a great horned owl. … Continue reading